322: Shouting Across the Divide

322: Shouting Across the Divide

Dec 15, 2006
A Muslim woman persuades her husband that their family would be happier if they left the West Bank and moved to America. They do, and things are good...until September 11. After that, the elementary school their daughter goes to begins using a textbook that says Muslims want to kill Christians.
This and other stories of what happens when Muslims and non-Muslims try to communicate, and misfire. Alix Spiegel's story in this episode—"Act One. Which One of These Is Not Like the Others?"—won a 2008 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.
  • In the 1930s, the designer of the U.S. Supreme Court made a frieze to adorn the courtroom walls. It depicted eighteen great lawgivers through ages, including Moses, Solon, Confucius...and Muhammad. The only problem is that Islam forbids such portrayals of the prophet. Host Ira Glass talks to Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, about why the frieze is offensive to Muslims, and what they tried to do about it. (7 minutes) Legal SystemReligion

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